lunes, 28 de noviembre de 2016

Cardiovascular event rates and mortality according to achieved systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients with stable coronary artery disease: an international cohort study

Cardiovascular event rates and mortality according to achieved systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients with stable coronary artery disease: an international cohort study: In patients with hypertension and coronary artery disease from routine clinical practice,
systolic blood pressure of less than 120 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure of less
than 70 mm Hg were each associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, including
mortality, supporting the existence of a J-curve phenomenon. This finding suggests
that caution should be taken in the use of blood pressure-lowering treatment in patients
with coronary artery disease.

Incorrect catheter placement for drainage of malignant pericardial effusion

Incorrect catheter placement for drainage of malignant pericardial effusion

Efficacy and safety of re-treatment with the same artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACT) compared with an alternative ACT and quinine plus clindamycin after failure of first-line recommended ACT (QUINACT): a bicentre, open-label, phase 3, randomised controlled trial

Efficacy and safety of re-treatment with the same artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACT) compared with an alternative ACT and quinine plus clindamycin after failure of first-line recommended ACT (QUINACT): a bicentre, open-label, phase 3, randomised controlled trial: Re-treatment with the same ACT shows similar efficacy as recommended rescue treatments
and could be considered for rescue treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However,
the effect of this approach on the selection of resistant strains should be monitored
to ensure that re-treatment with the same ACT does not contribute to P falciparum
resistance.

A global call from five countries to collaborate in antibiotic stewardship: united we succeed, divided we might fail

A global call from five countries to collaborate in antibiotic stewardship: united we succeed, divided we might fail: In February, 2016, WHO released a report for the development of national action plans
to address the threat of antibiotic resistance, the catastrophic consequences of inaction,
and the need for antibiotic stewardship. Antibiotic stewardship combined with infection
prevention comprises a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach to optimise use of
antibiotics. Efforts to mitigate overuse will be unsustainable without learning and
coordinating activities globally. In this Personal View, we provide examples of international
collaborations to address optimal prescribing, focusing on five countries that have
developed different approaches to antibiotic stewardship—the USA, South Africa, Colombia,
Australia, and the UK.