sábado, 29 de febrero de 2020

Articles in Press: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Articles in Press: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

The Effect of Using PARO for People Living With Dementia and Chronic Pain: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

The Effect of Using PARO for People Living With Dementia and Chronic Pain: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial: To evaluate the effect of interaction with a robotic seal (PARO) on pain and behavioral
and psychological symptoms of people with dementia and chronic pain.

Adapting Gerontechnological Development to Hospitalized Frail Older People: Implementation of the ALLEGRO Hospital-Based Geriatric Living Lab - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Adapting Gerontechnological Development to Hospitalized Frail Older People: Implementation of the ALLEGRO Hospital-Based Geriatric Living Lab - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association: Gerontechnology aims at improving the functioning of older people and their carers
in their daily lives as well as improving gerontological practices. To promote gerontechnology
innovation in the hospital and bridge the gap between gerontechnology developers and
hospitalized frail older patients, our objective was to create and implement a hospital-based
geriatric living lab. We designed a hospital-based living lab, providing reflexive
workshops bringing around the table gerontechnology users and developers, supplemented
with an experimental hospital room receiving both the users and the devices to be
tested.

Palliative Care Implementation in Long-Term Care Facilities: European Association for Palliative Care White Paper

Palliative Care Implementation in Long-Term Care Facilities: European Association for Palliative Care White Paper: The number of older people dying in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is increasing
globally, but care quality may be variable. A framework was developed drawing on empirical
research findings from the Palliative Care for Older People (PACE) study and a scoping
review of literature on the implementation of palliative care interventions in LTCFs.
The PACE study mapped palliative care in LTCFs in Europe, evaluated quality of end-of-life
care and quality of dying in a cross-sectional study of deceased residents of LTCFs
in 6 countries, and undertook a cluster-randomized control trial that evaluated the
impact of the PACE Steps to Success intervention in 7 countries.

Duration of Care Trajectories in Persons With Dementia Differs According to Demographic and Clinical Characteristics - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Duration of Care Trajectories in Persons With Dementia Differs According to Demographic and Clinical Characteristics - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association: To estimate (1) the duration of no formal care, home care, and institutional care
after dementia diagnosis, and (2) the effect of age, sex, living situation, dementia
medication, migration background, and income on this dementia care duration.

Changes in Long-Term Care Markets: Assisted Living Supply and the Prevalence of Low-Care Residents in Nursing Homes - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Changes in Long-Term Care Markets: Assisted Living Supply and the Prevalence of Low-Care Residents in Nursing Homes - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association: To assess the effect of changes in assisted living (AL) capacity within a market on
prevalence of residents with low care needs in nursing homes.

The Imperative for Person-Centered Dementia Care: Focus on Assessing and Working With Long-Term Care Residents Rather Than Percentage of People on a Medication - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

The Imperative for Person-Centered Dementia Care: Focus on Assessing and Working With Long-Term Care Residents Rather Than Percentage of People on a Medication - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association: We appreciate the attention Drs Kale, Gitlin, and Lyketsos bring to CMS's singular
focus on antipsychotic use in those long-term care (LTC) residents with dementia and
behavior disturbance. As the authors point out, these universal behaviors are themselves
associated with poor health outcomes including mortality, injury to peers and staff,
and other undesirable outcomes. We agree with their premise: the focus on this 1 class
of medication without assessing the resident and the entire situation is both misguided
and leads to the use of less effective, more risky, and less evidence-based interventions.

The Imperative for Person-Centered Dementia Care: Focus on Assessing and Working With Long-Term Care Residents Rather Than Percentage of People on a Medication - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

The Imperative for Person-Centered Dementia Care: Focus on Assessing and Working With Long-Term Care Residents Rather Than Percentage of People on a Medication - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association: We appreciate the attention Drs Kale, Gitlin, and Lyketsos bring to CMS's singular
focus on antipsychotic use in those long-term care (LTC) residents with dementia and
behavior disturbance. As the authors point out, these universal behaviors are themselves
associated with poor health outcomes including mortality, injury to peers and staff,
and other undesirable outcomes. We agree with their premise: the focus on this 1 class
of medication without assessing the resident and the entire situation is both misguided
and leads to the use of less effective, more risky, and less evidence-based interventions.

International Consensus Definition of a Serious Infection in a Geriatric Patient Presenting to Ambulatory Care

International Consensus Definition of a Serious Infection in a Geriatric Patient Presenting to Ambulatory Care: Early recognition and prompt treatment of a serious infection is important to optimize
prognosis in older patients. The current evidence base underpinning this early recognition
in ambulatory care is scattered and haphazard, calling for new research to strengthen
clinical practice. Before embarking on such studies, it is important to seek consensus
on what constitutes a serious infection in older patients presenting to ambulatory
care. We conducted a 4-round e-Delphi study seeking consensus among medical professionals
who deliver clinical care to older patients using online questionnaires and feedback.

Antipsychotic Drugs, Fracture Risk, and Frailty in Older Patients

Antipsychotic Drugs, Fracture Risk, and Frailty in Older Patients: I read the recent article published in this journal and written by Gafoor et al1 with
great interest. The authors conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effect of
first- or second-generation antipsychotic drugs on fracture risk with special reference
to levels of frailty in patients aged 80 years and older. Fracture incidence increased
with frailty progression, and frail patients received more frequent antipsychotic
drug treatment than nonfrail patients. Adjusted rate ratios (RRs) [95% confidence
intervals (CIs)] of the first and second generation antipsychotic drug exposure on
the risk of any fracture were 1.24 (1.07‒1.43) and 1.12 (1.01‒1.24), respectively.

Response to Letter: Antipsychotic Drugs, Fracture Risk, and Frailty in Older Patients - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Response to Letter: Antipsychotic Drugs, Fracture Risk, and Frailty in Older Patients - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association: We are grateful for the opportunity to respond to comments raised by Tomoyuki Kawada.
The studies1,2 referred to by Dr Kawada show a positive association between increasing
frailty level and risk of fracture. Kawada highlights differences in the reported
magnitude of the estimates of association in these studies (inter alia). These differences
could be explained by (1) differences in the populations at risk, which are not identical
in the 2 studies with systematic differences in sample selection; (2) analyses are
not identical and adjustment for confounding variables differs between these studies;
or (3) odds ratios are expected to provide more extreme estimates than relative risks.

The Post-Acute Delayed Discharge Risk Scale: Derivation and Validation With Ontario Alternate Level of Care Patients in Ontario Complex Continuing Care Hospitals - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

The Post-Acute Delayed Discharge Risk Scale: Derivation and Validation With Ontario Alternate Level of Care Patients in Ontario Complex Continuing Care Hospitals - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association: To describe and validate the Post-acute Delayed Discharge Risk Scale (PADDRS), which
classifies patients by risk of delayed discharge on admission to post-acute care settings
using information collected with the interRAI Minimum Data Set (MDS) 2.0 assessment.

martes, 18 de febrero de 2020

El coronavirus chino explicado por un virólogo

Como saber mas del nuevo coronavirus

Entrenamiento en línea como arma para combatir el nuevo coronavirus



7 de febrero de 2020 


Más de 25 000 personas en todo el mundo han accedido al conocimiento en tiempo real de los expertos de la OMS sobre cómo detectar, prevenir, responder y controlar el nuevo coronavirus en los 10 días posteriores al lanzamiento de una capacitación abierta en línea.
El equipo de aprendizaje del Programa de Emergencias Sanitarias de la OMS trabajó con expertos técnicos para desarrollar y publicar rápidamente el curso en línea el 26 de enero, 4 días antes de que el brote de 2019-nCoV fuera declarado una emergencia de salud pública de preocupación internacional.
Aproximadamente 3000 nuevos usuarios se han registrado para la capacitación todos los días desde su lanzamiento, lo que demuestra el alto nivel de interés en el virus entre los profesionales de la salud y el público en general. Además, más de 200 000 personas han visto el video introductorio del curso en YouTube.
Los altos niveles de compromiso surgieron cuando la comunidad internacional lanzó un plan de preparación y respuesta de US $ 675 millones para luchar contra una mayor propagación del nuevo coronavirus y proteger a los estados con sistemas de salud más débiles.
El recurso de aprendizaje gratuito está disponible para cualquier persona interesada en el nuevo coronavirus en la plataforma de aprendizaje abierto de la OMS para emergencias, OpenWHO.org . La plataforma se estableció hace 3 años con emergencias como nCoV en mente, en las cuales la OMS necesitaría llegar a millones de personas en todo el mundo con materiales de aprendizaje accesibles en tiempo real.
La capacitación en línea, titulada "Virus respiratorios emergentes, incluido nCoV: métodos de detección, prevención, respuesta y control", se está produciendo actualmente en todos los idiomas oficiales de las Naciones Unidas y en portugués.
"Nuestro trabajo es trabajar con expertos técnicos en salud para agrupar el conocimiento utilizando principios de aprendizaje de adultos, rápidamente, de modo que sea más útil para los trabajadores de salud y nuestro personal", dijo Heini Utunen, quien administra OpenWHO para el Programa de Emergencias de Salud de la OMS (WHE). “Nuestra plataforma en línea, OpenWHO, ya es visitada por usuarios de todos los países del mundo, ofreciendo más de 60 cursos en 21 idiomas. Impartir capacitación en el idioma local de los respondedores es realmente importante, especialmente en una emergencia ”.    
WHE ha estado invirtiendo en aprendizaje y capacitación para fortalecer la preparación y la respuesta en tiempo real a emergencias de salud. El programa desarrolló su primera estrategia de aprendizaje en 2018 y tiene una pequeña Unidad de Aprendizaje y Desarrollo de Capacidades que le permite a WHE desarrollar capacitaciones rápidamente y obtener conocimientos para aquellos que más lo necesitan en la primera línea.  
Para obtener la información más reciente sobre el nuevo coronavirus, visite la página 2019-nCoV 

domingo, 16 de febrero de 2020

Un sistema para optimizar el tratamiento antibiótico en pacientes hospitalizados en sus domicilios | @diariofarma

Un sistema para optimizar el tratamiento antibiótico en pacientes hospitalizados en sus domicilios | @diariofarma: Los servicios de Farmacia y de Urgencias del Hospital Infanta Leonor de Madrid pusieron en marcha, hace ahora dos años, un proyecto para optimizar el tratamiento con antibióticos en pacientes hospitalizados a domicilio aplicando un programa de bombas elastoméricas.

martes, 4 de febrero de 2020

Fifth Global Ministerial Summit on Patient Safety 2020

27–28 de febrero de 2020, Montreux, Suiza

Suiza será la sede de la 5ª Cumbre Ministerial Mundial sobre Seguridad del Paciente, que tendrá lugar del 27 al 28 de febrero de 2020, en Montreux, Suiza.
Desde su inicio en 2016, las Cumbres Ministeriales Globales sobre Seguridad del Paciente han logrado crear conciencia, así como crear y mantener el impulso del movimiento global de seguridad del paciente, como lo demuestra la reciente adopción de la resolución WHA sobre la "Acción Global on Patient Safety ", que permitió el primer Día Mundial de la Seguridad del Paciente en septiembre de 2019. Uno de los desafíos clave que enfrenta la seguridad del paciente hoy en día consiste en garantizar la implementación adecuada y sostenible de conceptos y enfoques adecuados, cruciales para garantizar el éxito de la WHA -resolución.
Sobre la base del éxito de las cumbres pasadas, la Cumbre 2020 se centrará en este tema crítico, con el lema "Menos daños, una mejor atención: de la resolución a la implementación" como tema central. La Cumbre reconocerá el progreso realizado hasta el momento y, al mismo tiempo, contemplará el futuro de este esfuerzo global de salud pública. Como la seguridad del paciente se refiere a un amplio espectro de problemas y políticas de atención médica, como la gobernanza, la seguridad quirúrgica y las infecciones adquiridas en la atención médica, la Cumbre 2020 incorporará los aspectos temáticos correspondientes. Se esforzará por mostrar cómo se puede lograr una implementación exitosa y sostenible en diferentes contextos y entornos.
Como en años anteriores, la Cumbre 2020 consistirá en dos días. El primer día reunirá a las partes interesadas internacionales y expertos de clase mundial en el campo de la seguridad del paciente y el segundo día unirá a ministros de todo el mundo para intercambiar información y buenas prácticas sobre estos temas.
El registro es gratuito y abierto a cualquier persona. Más información y un programa detallado están disponibles en el sitio web de la Cumbre.


Ver tambien las metas internacionales en seguridad del paciente

domingo, 2 de febrero de 2020

Que es el Coronavirus?




Los coronavirus (CoV) son una gran familia de virus que causan enfermedades que van desde el resfriado común hasta enfermedades más graves, como el síndrome respiratorio de Oriente Medio (MERS-CoV)  y el síndrome respiratorio agudo severo (SARS-CoV) . Un nuevo coronavirus (nCoV)  es una nueva cepa que no se ha identificado previamente en humanos.  

Los coronavirus son zoonóticos, lo que significa que se transmiten entre animales y personas. Investigaciones detalladas encontraron que el SARS-CoV se transmitió de gatos de civeta a humanos y el MERS-CoV de camellos dromedarios a humanos. Varios coronavirus conocidos circulan en animales que aún no han infectado a los humanos. Aunque este nuevo caso aun esta en investigación sobre su origen.

Los signos comunes de infección incluyen síntomas respiratorios, fiebre, tos, dificultad para respirar y dificultades para respirar. En casos más graves, la infección puede causar neumonía, síndrome respiratorio agudo severo, insuficiencia renal e incluso la muerte. 

Las recomendaciones estándar para prevenir la propagación de la infección incluyen lavarse las manos regularmente, cubrirse la boca y la nariz al toser y estornudar, cocinar bien la carne y los huevos. Evite el contacto cercano con cualquier persona que presente síntomas de enfermedades respiratorias, como tos y estornudos.




Un nuevo coronavirus (CoV) es una nueva cepa de coronavirus que no se ha identificado previamente en humanos.  


Investigaciones detalladas encontraron que el SARS-CoV se transmitió de gatos de civeta a humanos en China en 2002 y el MERS-CoV de camellos dromedarios a humanos en Arabia Saudita en 2012. Varios coronavirus conocidos circulan en animales que aún no han infectado a humanos. A medida que la vigilancia mejora en todo el mundo, es probable que se identifiquen más coronavirus.


Depende del virus, pero los signos comunes incluyen síntomas respiratorios, fiebre, tos, dificultad para respirar y dificultades para respirar. En casos más graves, la infección puede causar neumonía, síndrome respiratorio agudo severo, insuficiencia renal e incluso la muerte. 


Sí, algunos coronavirus pueden transmitirse de persona a persona, generalmente después de un contacto cercano con un paciente infectado, por ejemplo, en un lugar de trabajo doméstico o en un centro de atención médica.


Cuando una enfermedad es nueva, no hay vacuna hasta que se desarrolla una. Pueden pasar varios años hasta que se desarrolle una nueva vacuna.


No existe un tratamiento específico para la enfermedad causada por un nuevo coronavirus. Sin embargo, muchos de los síntomas pueden tratarse y, por lo tanto, el tratamiento se basa en la condición clínica del paciente. Además, la atención de apoyo para las personas infectadas puede ser muy efectiva.


Las recomendaciones estándar para reducir la exposición y la transmisión de una variedad de enfermedades incluyen el mantenimiento de la higiene básica de las manos y las vías respiratorias, y prácticas alimentarias seguras y evitar el contacto cercano, cuando sea posible, con cualquier persona que muestre síntomas de enfermedades respiratorias como tos y estornudos.


Sí, pueden serlo, ya que los trabajadores de la salud entran en contacto con los pacientes con más frecuencia que el público en general. La OMS recomienda que los trabajadores de la salud apliquen de manera consistente medidas apropiadas de prevención y control de infecciones .


La OMS alienta a todos los países a mejorar su vigilancia de las infecciones respiratorias agudas graves (IRAG), a revisar cuidadosamente cualquier patrón inusual de casos de IRAG o neumonía y a notificar a la OMS sobre cualquier caso sospechoso o confirmado de infección con nuevo coronavirus.

Se alienta a los países a continuar fortaleciendo su preparación para emergencias sanitarias de conformidad con el Reglamento Sanitario Internacional (2005).